FLN
Definition - An acronym standing for the language faculty in the narrow sense, i.e. those aspects of human language that are unique to humans.

As opposed to FLB, the language faculty in the broad sense , i.e. language in general. This includes the properties that human languages share with non-human (e.g. animal) communication systems, as well as aspects of language that are used by other cognitive systems (e.g. computers).

Etymology -
The term was coined by Marc Hauser, Noam Chomsky, and W. Tecumseh Fitch for their 2002 paper The Faculty of Language: What Is It, Who Has It, and How Did It Evolve?. To read the paper, click here.

Note: I contacted Dr Hauser and he confirmed the etymology: "Yes, we indeed coined the terms. The thinking derives in part from work in the cognitive sciences, and especially the distinction between domain-general and domain-specific thinking, as well as the modularity thesis."

Quotation -
"FLB includes a sensory-motor system, a conceptual-intentional system, and the computational mechanisms for recursion, providing the capacity to generate an infinite range of expressions from a finite set of elements. We hypothesize that FLN only includes recursion and is the only uniquely human component of the faculty of language. We further argue that FLN may have evolved for reasons other than language, hence comparative studies might look for evidence of such computations outside of the domain of communication (for example, number, navigation, and social relations).
(Source: The Faculty of Language: What Is It, Who Has It, and How Did It Evolve? (Marc D. Hauser, Noam Chomsky, and W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2002))



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