optative mood
Definition - The grammatical mood that expresses either wishes or desires.

Example -
The term is more applicable to languages like ancient Greek and Albanian. However, the phrase Heaven Forfend! (i.e. Heaven protect us!) is an example of this mood in English.

Etymology -
The word ultimately derives from the Latin optatus, which is the past participle of optare, to desire or choose.
Note: The Latin grammarians, such as Priscian, called it optativus modus.

Oxford English Dictionary -
Its first citation is from 1530:
"The optative mode whiche they use whan they wisshe a dede to be done,
as bien parle il, wel speke he or well myght he speke."
(Jehan Palsgrave, Lesclarcissement de la langue françoyse, 84 )



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