Wernicke’s aphasia
Definition - A type of aphasia where a person speaks with almost normal grammar, syntax, intonation, and stress, but what they say is close to gibberish.

Notes:
1. This type of aphasia was first described by Carl Wernicke; its understanding was advanced substantially by Norman Geschwind.
2. It results from injury to the Wernicke area in the posterior upper temporal lobe (i.e. the back-left part of the brain).

Example -

Etymology -
The term derives from the name of the German neurologist, Karl Wernicke (1848–1905).

Oxford English Dictionary -
Its first citation is from 1887:
"The word, when it is heard, may fail to call up the appropriate mental image. Kussmaul has given this condition the name of word deafness (Wernicke's sensory aphasia). The patient is not really deaf, for he hears everything, but he no longer understands what he hears, and has forgotten what the words signify."
(Vickery & Knapp tr. Strümpell's Text-bk. Med. 679)

Quotation -
"The patient is not really deaf, for he hears everything, but he no longer understands what he hears, and has forgotten what the words signify."
(Source: 1887 Vickery & Knapp tr. Strümpell's Text-bk. Med. 679 (OED))



Please comment

Email: